visibility

Bisexual Pride Flag Flies Over Camden Town Hall

20160923_101452The bisexual pride flag was today raised over a London council building for the first time.

Nadia Shah, who was appointed Mayor of Camden in May 2016, hoisted the flag in a small ceremony on the roof of Camden Town Hall at 1oam today. The ceremony was attended by members of the Bisexual Index and Camden LGBT Forum as well as local activists and civic staff.

Mayor Nadia Shah addresses the crowd

Mayor Nadia Shah addresses the crowd

The flag has been flown at Council buildings in Brighton and Hove since 2012, but other councils have been reluctant to follow suit. This year, just five further councils (including Camden) – out of more than 410 –  have chosen to follow suit.

The Bisexual Index told Biscuit, “a lot of councils have told us that they fly the rainbow flag for gay pride, and that we’re included in that. But bisexuals… Continue reading

Bi Visibility Day: Activists For LGBT Charity Stonewall Tell Their Stories

Stonewall, the biggest LGBT charity in the UK, hasn’t always had the best track record when it comes to bisexual visibility in its campaigns. But things are changing fast under a new leadership team and here at Biscuit we salute their efforts – and bring you two bi activists very proud to be speaking out under the Stonewall banner…

Sarah LynnSarah Lynn, Communications Officer, Stonewall Cymru

I recently started my first relationship with a woman. Despite knowing that I identify very openly as bi (pansexual to be exact), and that I had previously dated men, my housemate and friends like to crack jokes about how me and my girlfriend will soon be moving in together and getting a cat – because that’s what lesbians do.

Ridiculous stereotypes and tired jokes aside, knowing that even though I am very open about my sexuality, it is still not taken seriously by those… Continue reading

Bi Visibility Day: “My friend gave me a magnet that said ‘Bi Now, Gay Later’…”

empty-white-badge2Bi Visibility Day, says Sarah Evans, is a day to celebrate those who are vocal and proud – like these women.

I like to enjoy my supportive community and encourage others to be visible but the people I try and celebrate the most are those who make it their mission to challenge biphobia, bi erasure and my new pet hate – assumption.

In 2013 LGBT Youth North West started a brilliant campaign to challenge heterosexism (the idea that everyone in society is presumed to be heterosexual) called “Don’t Assume…”. It started with “Don’t assume I’m heterosexual” then young people started completing the sentences with their own endings. It made me think about how many people have assumed that my sexuality is a phase, that I won’t be monogamous, and that because I have a female partner I am no longer bi. I started to get angry. It’s been two years… Continue reading

Hoisting our colours: A brief history of the bisexual pride flag

flag1The bi pride flag has become internationally recognised symbol of our movement, so it’s surprising that so many people don’t really know where it came from of what it represents. Now, we can’t have that, so with a little help from thewaybackmachine, and the good people at BiNet USA, Biscuit presents a history of the bisexual flag.

There are lots of symbols that represent homosexuality. From the (pun not intended) gaiety of the rainbow flag to the somber significance of the inverted pink or black triangles or the mythological connections of the labrys, you can usually find a motif that suits your purpose.

But until 1998, when Michael Page designed the flag that would become a global shorthand for bisexuality, there was no universal symbol under which the movement could unite. Many bisexual people did not feel a connection to the already iconic rainbow flag, which seemed to belong… Continue reading

Nicole Kristal: "Why I created the 'Still Bisexual' campaign"

2408oat-w800h800z1-85019-yes-im-still-bisexualI’m still bisexual.” It’s the phrase we utter to our friends and lovers, our families and co-workers, year after year, until we’re blue in the face.  It’s difficult to accept that reminding people of our bisexuality is both necessary and never-ending, so some of us abandon it altogether out of tedium or to avoid the scoffs and disbelief our orientation often inspires.

In the short-term, it seems easier if we’re partnered to just let people assume we are straight or gay. We let our bisexuality slip into our silent pasts just to make our boyfriends, girlfriends, wives and husbands feel more comfortable. But making everyone else more comfortable is coming at a tremendous expense to our own health and happiness. And it needs to stop. We need another way.

Going to the trouble of reminding people we are still bisexual is about choosing truth over convenience and… Continue reading