support

United States Activists Call for Support from Across the Atlantic

<> on February 21, 2016 in Greenville, South Carolina.

<> on February 21, 2016 in Greenville, South Carolina.

President-Elect Trump has got lots of us worried. The UK has got a lot of reasons to be fearful of a Trump presidency, and rightly so, but our fears are minimal compared to those about to be living under Trumpian rule. We spoke to our across-the-Atlantic fave, Miles Joyner, about what we can do to support our American allies, and this is what they told us.

The United States are in turmoil once again. Marginalized groups are concerned about their safety, about the legislation that will start being passed. Will we keep our rights? Am I safe in public? Is my partner safe in public? Is my child safe in public? Many POC, Muslim, and LGBTQ individuals have been asking themselves that question for years now, yet with the recent election the question is more important… Continue reading

Bi Visibility Day: “My friend gave me a magnet that said ‘Bi Now, Gay Later’…”

empty-white-badge2Bi Visibility Day, says Sarah Evans, is a day to celebrate those who are vocal and proud – like these women.

I like to enjoy my supportive community and encourage others to be visible but the people I try and celebrate the most are those who make it their mission to challenge biphobia, bi erasure and my new pet hate – assumption.

In 2013 LGBT Youth North West started a brilliant campaign to challenge heterosexism (the idea that everyone in society is presumed to be heterosexual) called “Don’t Assume…”. It started with “Don’t assume I’m heterosexual” then young people started completing the sentences with their own endings. It made me think about how many people have assumed that my sexuality is a phase, that I won’t be monogamous, and that because I have a female partner I am no longer bi. I started to get angry. It’s been two years… Continue reading

We speak to Domestic Abuse Caseworker Sarah Golightley

abusedwomanSarah Golightley, Domestic Abuse Caseworker for the London LGBT Domestic Abuse Partnership, tells Biscuit about the Partnership’s work

“The first few months were fantastic. She was charming, outgoing and I really liked her. But I started to sense things were moving a bit too quickly for me, particularly after she’d insisted we live together. That’s when things started to change for the worse. She started acting jealous around my friends. She’d constantly text me and call me up at work, asking where I’d been. Then she became aggressive. She’d make remarks about telling my family that I’m bi because she knew I’m wasn’t out to them. I sometimes feel intimated being around her, worried that I might accidentally upset her. Other times being with her is great: she apologises, but then something sparks her anger again. Sometimes she blames me for ‘making’ her upset. It feels confusing.”

This is a familiar story of domestic abuse faced by LGBT people. Some of the specifics might change: ‘she’ might be ‘he’ or ‘they’, or it could be abuse from a parent or an ex-partner. Your story could be very different. There may be pressure for you to have sex when you don’t want to. Perhaps there is physical violence, threats or bi-phobic remarks. It can be ongoing abuse, or a one-off incident. It might be hard to even think of it as being abuse at all. Is it that bad? How bad does it have to be before it’s considered to be abusive?
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