society

Out Of Mind: Let’s Talk About Bi Women And Mental Health…

worried-girl-413690_1920Another day, another grim story about budget cuts. In the last four years, benefit sanctions against people with mental illnesses have increased six hundred times. Nearly 20,000 people have had their disability benefits stopped, sometimes for weeks at a time, in an attempt to force compliance with schemes such as Welfare to Work which tries to help people back into employment. But as the charity Mind has pointed out, forcing people into financial difficulties is not exactly conducive to good mental health.

This counter-intuitive approach to recovery and work is hardly an anomaly. Mental health services in the UK are in crisis. Budgets are plummeting, and care professionals are increasingly depending upon unproven services to make severe cuts. Short term financial problems are compounding a longer standing issue – the fact that mental health has so often been the poor relative of physical health when it comes to treatment… Continue reading

Bi, Poly, Parent, Anti-christ: Parenting while bi in a straight, straight world.

identity-683963_1280What do you get when you combine two mums, a dad, fourteen children and a conservative society? Why, a super villain of course! Valarie Clark-Neff takes wry look at the pitfalls of parenting while polyamorous and bi…

Dear children,

Please be advised: Your mom is a supervillain, hell-bent on destroying the patriarchy. She sometimes assumes civilian form and tries to blend into mainstream (straight) society, but much of her time is spent as a misandrist miscreant, fighting against biphobia, homophobia, misogyny, and other forms of bigotry.

You see the society you are inheriting is full of power hungry people who believe there is only one right way to have a family – with the man as the head of the household and the woman and children supporting him in his endeavors. The structure of this ideal family in our society is rigid and doesn’t allow for variation. It divides society… Continue reading

"I want to create more dialogue around bisexuality": Vlog part 1 from poet Michelle LaBelle

We speak to Domestic Abuse Caseworker Sarah Golightley

abusedwomanSarah Golightley, Domestic Abuse Caseworker for the London LGBT Domestic Abuse Partnership, tells Biscuit about the Partnership’s work

“The first few months were fantastic. She was charming, outgoing and I really liked her. But I started to sense things were moving a bit too quickly for me, particularly after she’d insisted we live together. That’s when things started to change for the worse. She started acting jealous around my friends. She’d constantly text me and call me up at work, asking where I’d been. Then she became aggressive. She’d make remarks about telling my family that I’m bi because she knew I’m wasn’t out to them. I sometimes feel intimated being around her, worried that I might accidentally upset her. Other times being with her is great: she apologises, but then something sparks her anger again. Sometimes she blames me for ‘making’ her upset. It feels confusing.”

This is a familiar story of domestic abuse faced by LGBT people. Some of the specifics might change: ‘she’ might be ‘he’ or ‘they’, or it could be abuse from a parent or an ex-partner. Your story could be very different. There may be pressure for you to have sex when you don’t want to. Perhaps there is physical violence, threats or bi-phobic remarks. It can be ongoing abuse, or a one-off incident. It might be hard to even think of it as being abuse at all. Is it that bad? How bad does it have to be before it’s considered to be abusive?
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