mental health

Five Ways You Can Look After Bi Mental Health

mental-health-2019924_960_720Bisexual Mental Health Month (BMHM) may feel long over, but that doesn’t mean you need to wait another year to discuss the sweeping mental health issues facing the bi+ community, or to feel guilt-free about focusing on your own mental health troubles. Here are a few things bi+ people and our allies can do to help safeguard the mental health of the bi+ community.

BMHM is an American campaign that runs throughout March to raise awareness of the mental health issues facing the bisexual community. Due to its online presence, it’s beginning to become internationally observed. But mental health doesn’t isn’t just an issue once a year. Here’s how you can look after yours, and others, all year round.

Find bi+ friendly support

Unfortunately, many bisexual people have difficulty getting support for their mental health issues, despite having some of the worse mental health stats in the LGBT+ community.… Continue reading

Research Round-up: Why Is Bisexual Mental Health So Poor?

MPOTY_2014_Helping_someone_get_treatment_for_mental_health_issuesBisexuals face many problems, including higher than average rates of interpersonal violence (IPV) and homelessness, but at top of that list is mental health. In a Biscuit poll in February 88% of respondents reported having had mental health problems at some point, with 37% reporting saying that theirs were severe.

But this is only just scratching the surface, as a 2010 study conducted by the San Francisco Human Rights Commission found bisexuals to be around six times more likely to have mental health problems than heterosexuals. The study also incorporated data from a 2002 study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, which reported that rates of mental health issues amongst bisexual people were significantly higher than those amongst lesbians and gay men.

My partners and I constantly argue over whether our mental health is a function of our bisexuality, vice versa, or unrelated. – Phil

A YouGov poll from… Continue reading

Being Bi – My First Pride

imagesFrom the erasure of bisexual participation in the early Pride movement, to incidences of biphobia at Pride events today, the bisexual community has had an uneasy relationship with Pride. But when we focus on the worst Pride can be, we can forget about the best. Here Clara from Retrogreat.com reminds us just how important it can be.

I’m 9 years old. Some friends and I play “Mummies and Daddies”. It turns into a campaign at school of calling me a dyke and a lesbian. I don’t understand – I have crushes on both men and women, but assume puberty will establish a preference.

I’m 17 years old. One night at a classmate’s house, she strokes my waist, she feels different to the lone boy I’ve kissed so far. Her boyfriend watches from a chair. After a while, she leaps away without warning, begins to cry and… Continue reading

Being Bi – Borderline Personality Disorder

118HUsually when we talk about sexual behaviour as a symptom, it’s metaphorical, but when you’re bi and living with Borderline Personality Disorder your sexuality really is seen as a symptom, representing emotional and social instability, promiscuity and volatility.  Friend of Biscuit Cat shares her experience navigating the way.

“I’m bisexual and I have a diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), a serious mental illness marked by unstable moods, behaviour, and relationships that has been in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders since 1980.

Mental health issues are prevalent in the bi community, with a higher than average number of bisexuals having suffered from mental health problems at some point when compared to the general population. Bisexual women in particular are more likely to suffer (in a Biscuit poll earlier this year only 12% of respondents said they had never suffered from… Continue reading

Four Reasons This Bisexual Article is Definitely Not Clickbait

Being bisexual is great. In fact, being bisexual is so great that if a bisexual is not skipping down the road singing ‘I Am What I Am’ and waving the bisexual pride flag, it can only be because they’re asleep. It’s f*cking awesome, apparently. LUCKY!

1) You’re the most alluring individual most people know

Bisexuals are just so exotic. Y’know, like parrots. And, like parrots, you can teach them to repeat phrases, like ‘society has exoticised me to such an extent that people either think I don’t exist or that I’m a libido with legs’, and ‘lesbian and gay communities are resolutely biphobic’.

You’re so sexydifferent that it can make you feel lonely and isolated, and that’s just one of the reasons that rates of mental health problems and eating disorders are sky high among your peers. In fact, if you’re a bisexual woman, you’re fully 37% more… Continue reading

Out Of Mind: Let’s Talk About Bi Women And Mental Health…

worried-girl-413690_1920Another day, another grim story about budget cuts. In the last four years, benefit sanctions against people with mental illnesses have increased six hundred times. Nearly 20,000 people have had their disability benefits stopped, sometimes for weeks at a time, in an attempt to force compliance with schemes such as Welfare to Work which tries to help people back into employment. But as the charity Mind has pointed out, forcing people into financial difficulties is not exactly conducive to good mental health.

This counter-intuitive approach to recovery and work is hardly an anomaly. Mental health services in the UK are in crisis. Budgets are plummeting, and care professionals are increasingly depending upon unproven services to make severe cuts. Short term financial problems are compounding a longer standing issue – the fact that mental health has so often been the poor relative of physical health when it comes to treatment… Continue reading

Human Rights Commission Report: “Bisexuals Are At Greater Risk Of Health Problems.”

depression-824998_1280The “Health Disparities Among Bisexual People” report shows that bisexuals experience worse health than people of any other sexual orientation, including gay men and lesbians.

Bisexual women were found to have higher rates of cancer, heart disease, obesity and mental health problems than any other group of women. Bisexuals of all genders were found to have higher rates of depression and display the most incidences of binge drinking, self-harming and suicidal behaviours.

“Bisexual people are the largest single group within the LGBT community, but we’re not addressing their specific healthcare needs,” said Tari Hanneman, Deputy Director of the Health and Aging Program at the HRC Foundation.“The reality is that bisexual people face discrimination not only outside of our community, but also from within. And that can discourage them from engaging in and benefiting from the work that LGBT advocates are doing to address our mental, physical and sexual health.”… Continue reading

Book Review: Men Can Wear Dresses Too, Caite Maye

mcwdtCertified bookworm and friend of Biscuit Sophia reads a first-hand account of living as a cross-dresser.

This intriguing book by Catie Maye explores the issues surrounding the lives of an often marginalised part of the transgender community, male cross-dressers and gender-fluid people.

Maye has approached the topic through the lens of her own experiences as a male-to-female cross-dresser and her widening exploration of what she calls her ‘feminine side’, at first tentatively and, as the years passed, with increasing confidence.

Born in 1960 and growing up in a working class area of London, Maye began cross-dressing at the age of nine (not untypical), and has continued to do so to the present day. She’s heterosexual and is married with children, which again is most common. The majority of male cross-dressers identify as straight (the percentage who identify as gay or bi is roughly in proportion to the figures for… Continue reading

The Biscuit Purple List 2015

purple_glitter_backdrop

Your nominations have been collected, heated discussions have been had and disagreements have been thwarted, and now we are proud to be able to present the first ever Biscuit Purple List.

The Purple List was conceived as a reaction to the bi-erasure of similar honours lists, which neither recognise the work done that specifically benefits the bisexual community, nor the importance using the word ‘bisexual’ to describe the non-monosexual people who do appear in them.

We think that it’s important to make a really big deal about the awesome people who give their time, energy, cash and resources to make life a little bit better for bisexual people. As a group we have lower rates of well being than gay and lesbian identified people. We’re more likely to commit suicide and to self harm. We are more likely to misuse drugs. Our teens have … Continue reading

You Didn't Hear it from Us 4/7/15


2014-05-Life-of-pix-legs-Sarah-babineauHere’s a round-up of some of the news, blogs posts and comment we missed this week.

 

Did… Continue reading