Kinsey Scale

Asylum Denied: The Grim Irony of Proof of Sexuality Edicts

United_States_Court_of_Appeals_for_the_Seventh_Circuit_Seal.svgLast week the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit issued a decision:that a  bi Jamaican asylum-seeker isn’t actually bisexual. As in Orashia Edwards recent Uk asylum case, Fuller found that his claim of bisexuality was rejected because of his relationships with women.  

If a documented history of relationships with more than one gender does not equal ‘bi’, what can we do? Holly Matthies tackles the thorny issue of ‘proving’ your sexuality.

My first exposure to the news of Ray Fuller’s failed asylum case was a tweet from Bisexual Index. “Horrifying,” it said. “Not bisexual because he’s attracted to women, asylum judge rules.”

My first response was to write When we say “Biphobia kills,” it’s not hyperbole. People don’t know what bisexuality is, and that harms bisexuals. It’s not the only way biphobia can be deadly, of course, but for anyone to be deported… Continue reading

Bi Visibility Day: “My friend gave me a magnet that said ‘Bi Now, Gay Later’…”

empty-white-badge2Bi Visibility Day, says Sarah Evans, is a day to celebrate those who are vocal and proud – like these women.

I like to enjoy my supportive community and encourage others to be visible but the people I try and celebrate the most are those who make it their mission to challenge biphobia, bi erasure and my new pet hate – assumption.

In 2013 LGBT Youth North West started a brilliant campaign to challenge heterosexism (the idea that everyone in society is presumed to be heterosexual) called “Don’t Assume…”. It started with “Don’t assume I’m heterosexual” then young people started completing the sentences with their own endings. It made me think about how many people have assumed that my sexuality is a phase, that I won’t be monogamous, and that because I have a female partner I am no longer bi. I started to get angry. It’s been two years… Continue reading

Hoisting our colours: A brief history of the bisexual pride flag

flag1The bi pride flag has become internationally recognised symbol of our movement, so it’s surprising that so many people don’t really know where it came from of what it represents. Now, we can’t have that, so with a little help from thewaybackmachine, and the good people at BiNet USA, Biscuit presents a history of the bisexual flag.

There are lots of symbols that represent homosexuality. From the (pun not intended) gaiety of the rainbow flag to the somber significance of the inverted pink or black triangles or the mythological connections of the labrys, you can usually find a motif that suits your purpose.

But until 1998, when Michael Page designed the flag that would become a global shorthand for bisexuality, there was no universal symbol under which the movement could unite. Many bisexual people did not feel a connection to the already iconic rainbow flag, which seemed to belong… Continue reading