bisexual pride flag

Here’s How To Make Bisexual Pride Cake

P1020165Pride season is just around the corner, and that means parties. 

Parties means cake. Here at Biscuit we are not cake bakers, but we are cake eaters, and that’s why we had our in-house culinary expert (she has a GCSE in Food Technology) develop this easy bisexual pride cake that even the most noviscular of novices – ie your Biscuit eds. – can manage.

You might notice that the bisexual element of the cake is hidden – some might say invisiblised – beneath a completely innocent looking facade. We couldn’t possibly comment.

Here’s how it’s done.

For the cake:
340g (12 oz) plain flour
340g (12 oz) caster sugar
340g (12 oz) room temp butter
six medium eggs
1.5 teaspoons baking powder
Food dye in pink, purple and blue
butter for greasing

For the buttercream filling:
375 (13 oz) icing sugar
225g (8 oz) softened butter
pinch… Continue reading

Hoisting our colours: A brief history of the bisexual pride flag

flag1The bi pride flag has become internationally recognised symbol of our movement, so it’s surprising that so many people don’t really know where it came from of what it represents. Now, we can’t have that, so with a little help from thewaybackmachine, and the good people at BiNet USA, Biscuit presents a history of the bisexual flag.

There are lots of symbols that represent homosexuality. From the (pun not intended) gaiety of the rainbow flag to the somber significance of the inverted pink or black triangles or the mythological connections of the labrys, you can usually find a motif that suits your purpose.

But until 1998, when Michael Page designed the flag that would become a global shorthand for bisexuality, there was no universal symbol under which the movement could unite. Many bisexual people did not feel a connection to the already iconic rainbow flag, which seemed to belong… Continue reading