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The Biscuit Purple List 2017

purple_glitter_backdropYour nominations have been counted, your thoughts have been collected and your faithful Biscuit team has cogitated, confabulated and contemplated every single line you’ve written. It hasn’t been easy, but we are at last ready to present the Biscuit Purple List 2017.

We asked you who inspired you, who made you proud and who you though deserved more recognition than they got, and you answered in your hundreds. You told us you value visibility as much as outreach and community building efforts, with household names like Sara Ramirez, Joe Lycett and Nicola Adams appearing alongside prominent activists like Jen Yockney and Meg-John Barker and community organisers like Sali Owen.

From the worker bees of grassroots organising to the Queer elite, the full gamut of the bi community is represented here. YouTube starlets who educate while they entertain; local group leaders who do so much more than just give us a space to… Continue reading

Five Ways You Can Look After Bi Mental Health

mental-health-2019924_960_720Bisexual Mental Health Month (BMHM) may feel long over, but that doesn’t mean you need to wait another year to discuss the sweeping mental health issues facing the bi+ community, or to feel guilt-free about focusing on your own mental health troubles. Here are a few things bi+ people and our allies can do to help safeguard the mental health of the bi+ community.

BMHM is an American campaign that runs throughout March to raise awareness of the mental health issues facing the bisexual community. Due to its online presence, it’s beginning to become internationally observed. But mental health doesn’t isn’t just an issue once a year. Here’s how you can look after yours, and others, all year round.

Find bi+ friendly support

Unfortunately, many bisexual people have difficulty getting support for their mental health issues, despite having some of the worse mental health stats in the LGBT+ community.… Continue reading

A Hand Along the Way – Volunteering in the Bisexual Community

volunteer-1The bisexual community thrives because of its volunteers. Some are highly visible – those who run events like last weekend’s highly successful EuroBiCon and the heads of organisations like BCNBiUK and the Bisexual Index, others work behind the scenes, doing accounts, designing posters and collecting tea money.  Biscuit fave Cat returns to tell us what the draw is, and how you can get involved. 

I’ve done quite a bit of volunteering work in the UK bi community over the years. I work full time and have children and, as a result, have limited free time – so why do I want to spend it doing more work when I could be relaxing?

Putting something back

I’ve been involved with the UK bi community for 10 years now, since I attended my first BiCon in 2003. Although I had other friends who were… Continue reading

Bi Online: Finding Your Community Without Leaving the House

laptop typingLet’s face it, if you’re bi it can be pretty tough going living in a world where heterosexuality is the norm. Most of the time your sexuality is completely erased and you’re assumed to be gay or straight depending on the gender of your current partner. When you’re not being erased you find yourself being othered for not fitting neatly into one of the gay or straight boxes. Having a space where bisexuality is the norm is important to give one a feeling of validity and belonging.

But what if there are no bi majority spaces that you can access? In the UK the main event in the bisexual calendar is BiCon, but this only happens once a year (and, as it happens, I can’t make it this year). There are BiFests happening throughout the year and regular bisexual meet up groups, but all of these are… Continue reading

The Biscuit Purple List 2015

purple_glitter_backdrop

Your nominations have been collected, heated discussions have been had and disagreements have been thwarted, and now we are proud to be able to present the first ever Biscuit Purple List.

The Purple List was conceived as a reaction to the bi-erasure of similar honours lists, which neither recognise the work done that specifically benefits the bisexual community, nor the importance using the word ‘bisexual’ to describe the non-monosexual people who do appear in them.

We think that it’s important to make a really big deal about the awesome people who give their time, energy, cash and resources to make life a little bit better for bisexual people. As a group we have lower rates of well being than gay and lesbian identified people. We’re more likely to commit suicide and to self harm. We are more likely to misuse drugs. Our teens have … Continue reading